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Garden Design Phase 2: The Planting Plan

Updated: May 19


Now that you have tested your soil, you have a much better idea of which types of plants and soil amendment to purchase. But, where in the yard do you plant them? This is where a planting plan comes in handy.


First, you need to get to know your yard. This is especially true if you're a new homeowner. Spend time in your yard -- as much time as you're able to -- and pay attention to the following: Which areas receive full sunlight, which areas receive partial shade (morning sun and afternoon shade and vice versa), which areas are mostly shady, and the areas that are exposed to wind.


Do you have a concrete driveway or an existing garden bed directly underneath a window? Or do you plan on building a garden bed in either of those areas? If so, keep in mind that windows reflect light and concrete absorbs heat which explains why areas closest to windows and concrete driveways are the warmest, especially during the summer months. For these areas, you will want to plant hardy perennials that are both heat and drought tolerant. Conversely, frost tends to settle in shady areas sooner than in sunny areas and lingers longer in those areas.


Once you have spent enough time in your yard, you will have an even better idea of which plants to purchase. When it comes to planting, group plants according to their species, hardiness, light, and soil requirements. For example, plant lavender with sage, stone crop sedum, and yarrow in areas of your yard that receive direct sunlight for more than six hours a day. Choose native plants as they are already well adapted to your region and hardiness zone, so they will thrive in almost any type of soil conditions. This is a perfect choice for a low-maintenance garden!


To maximize colour in your yard, plant plants that flower at different times of the year. For variety, include early spring blooming hyacinths and tulips with late spring and summer blooming hydrangeas, peonies, dahlias, and fall blooming stone crop sedums and chrysanthemums. If you live within hardiness zones 5 - 9, you can also include winter heather (Ericaceae) to add colour in the bleak, winter months.


Combine bright colors with cool colors (ie; blue, purple, white, and pastels) to create balance and harmony in your yard. You can also opt for greens and white if the contemporary look is what you're after. When it comes to choosing a design theme and corresponding plants, make sure it complements the architecture of your home.


If you are planting trees or shrubs that require a depth of more than two feet, make sure to locate property lines, utility lines, and septic drain field (if you have one) before you begin digging. The last thing you need is a ruptured utility line or angry neighbour. The cost spent on hiring a local land surveyor will be well worth it as it could save you potential thousands of dollars in damage or fines for digging in the wrong location.




Mindful Garden Design


One of the things to keep in mind when designing a client's garden is their budget. A client may want an elaborate outdoor living space that exceeds his or her budget. The more elaborate the design, the more money the client has to fork over for labour and materials.


With the right planning, though, it is possible to exceed your client's lavish desires if you focus on the design and re-landscaping of one area of their yard first before you start work on another area of the yard. That way, you stretch out work and your client pays you in installments or per project, thus making it much easier on their pocketbook. You also bide your client time to revisit and revise his or her vision for their landscape as work progresses. It's a win-win situation for everyone. This is what I refer to as mindful garden design.




Then again, sometimes less is more.


Even the simplest gardens can make an outdoor living space beautiful and enjoyable to spend time in throughout the spring and summer months.



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